Adoption from Child Welfare/Foster Care

familyforlife
A Family for Life: The Vital Need to Achieve Permanency for Children in Care

This Issue Brief is intended to provide a preview of and introduction to a book-length Compendium that the Donaldson Adoption Institute plans to publish in late 2013. It is based on extensive, years-long research throughout the United States, England and Canada on 22 specific practices that facilitate the adoption of children from foster care, and it provides a synthesis of knowledge related to these practices, research on outcomes and recommended resources.

Author: Susan Livingston Smith & Institute Staff

Published: April 2013

Never-Too-Old-Achieving-Permanency-and-Sustaining-Connections-for-Older-Youth-in-Foster-Care
Never Too Old: Achieving Permanency and Sustaining Connections for Older Youth in Foster Care

This report explores initiatives, synthesizes research findings, and makes recommendations for better meeting the needs of the growing proportion of youth who "age out" of foster care each year – and face daunting challenges in their transition to adulthood.

Author: Jeanne Howard and Stephanie Berzin

Published: July 2011

Finding-Families-for-African-American-Children-The-Role-of-Race-&-Law-in-Adoption-from-Foster-Care
Finding Families for African American Children: The Role of Race & Law in Adoption from Foster Care

This Institute report, endorsed by a broad range of national child-welfare organizations, is the most thorough examination to date of the often-sensitive, controversial issues relating to transracial adoption and calls for major changes to better serve the needs of children of color and to improve their prospects of moving to permanent, loving homes.

Author: Susan Smith, Ruth McRoy, Madelyn Freundlich, Joe Kroll

Published: May 2008

What's-Working-for-Children-A-Policy-Study-of-Adoption-Stability-and-Termination
What’s Working for Children: A Policy Study of Adoption Stability and Termination

This study reports that the vast majority of adoptions from foster care are remaining intact over time and raises questions about the effectiveness of state data-collection systems on adoption disruption and dissolution. It offers recommendations for improving policies and practices in order to lower the number of terminations, increase the prospects of success for children currently waiting in foster care for permanent homes, and improve the daily lives of the adoptive families that remain intact but nevertheless encounter challenges.

Author: Georgia Deoudes and Adam Pertman

Published: November 2004