Latest News

We know that news coverage and access to timely information drive awareness and, ultimately, the ability to influence positive change. Widely recognized as a leading authority on issues related to adoption, DAI is often featured in major media outlets. We also monitor, and share, developments in adoption and foster care policy, research, resources, as well as news, to keep practitioners, advocates, and those touched by adoption informed.
 

Help youths thrive after foster care

Philly.com - 06/17/2015

Each year, more than 1,000 Pennsylvania youths exit the foster care system without a form of permanency, meaning they aren’t reunited with their birth families or adopted. This was the case for 1,270 children in 2014, 472 of them in Philadelphia, according to the Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children.
For the past year, I have worked as a youth advocate for Family Design Resources. I travel around the state sharing my story with older foster youths in the hope that they will learn from my mistakes. We’ve also just developed a video version, Michelle’s Story.

Calling Rachel Dolezal ‘transracial’ is incorrect, dangerous: adoptees

Daily News - 06/17/2015

“The word is being co-opted,” said Lisa Marie Rollins, a writer, adoption scholar, and an adoptee herself. “It was very similar to what she has done as presenting herself as a black woman.”..
“It is important that people don’t try to redefine the word just because it seems to fit,” the 35-year-old said. “That redefinition erases an entire population of people.”
A group of adoptees, Rollins included, wrote an open letter Tuesday after Dolezal made her media blitz, calling on people to respect the term.


Rachel Dolezal draws ire of transracial adoptees

The Washington Post - 06/17/2015

But in interviews and Twitter hashtags, Dolezal has become the face of “transracial” — what, for many, is a new adjective on the battlefield of identity politics. And linking Dolezal with the word has offended many, among them those for whom growing up looking different is a familiar struggle: transracial adoptees.
“You’re turning something that is a historical experience into something that’s almost being made a joke,” Kimberly McKee told The Washington Post.

“Tough Love” Documentary Gives Insight Into Birth Parents’ Struggles

Chronicle of Social Change - 06/16/2015

“[‘Tough Love’] brought in a lot of elements that we think are important in the discussion of child welfare,” said Norris West, the director of strategic communications at the Annie E. Casey Foundation. He noted that the film highlighted the “many stakeholders in the child welfare system,” including child advocates, caseworkers and family court judges.
“It takes you into courtrooms where parents are involved in trying to tell their story,” he said. “Basically where they’re trying to get their act together.”


ACLU plans suit over religious liberty protections for Michigan adoption agencies

WORLD - 06/16/2015

But critics were quick to cry foul, claiming the law discriminates against gay couples.
“There is nothing about this shameful legislation that helps vulnerable kids find homes,” said Michigan ACLU Deputy Director Rana Elmir, who warned same-sex couples, religious minorities, single parents, and others could be affected.

New state adoption law can discriminate against anyone

The Detroit News - 06/16/2015

Our goal is to adopt a child from foster care. But, given our first experience and rejection, we are very concerned about the law signed by Gov. Rick Snyder last week allowing faith-based adoption agencies (including those funded by tax dollars) to deny services to families based on religious beliefs. This can include unmarried couples, same-sex couples, those who hold different religious beliefs or anyone else for any reason at all. The reasons don’t even need to be disclosed.
This is a real concern: All adoptions through foster care are handled by private agencies and our prior rejection was at one of Michigan’s largest faith-based agencies. What if we get the chance to adopt the little boy who calls us “mama” and “dada” only to be denied services because we aren’t Catholic enough, or didn’t donate enough or spoke out against policies such as this?


Children’s Home to receive $142,500 for post-adoption services

Watertown Daily Times - 06/16/2015

“These children have had a lot of disruptions in their lives. Some of them have been abused or neglected and have been separated from their families,” Jefferson County Social Services Commissioner Teresa W. Gaffney said. “When they are adopted, we are no longer in the picture, and it’s beneficial to continue supporting these families and provide extra counseling.”

Camp to Belong Colorado Reunites Siblings Separated by Foster Care

Rocky Mountain PBS - 06/15/2015

In Colorado, about 1,100 kids are a part of the state foster care system every year. Stacey Sanders, a camp executive, says that of the youth in foster care, about 500 are separated from one or more sibling each year.
Sanders hopes that Camp To Belong Colorado can expand to bring even more children together, and that she can organize more stable programing for sibling reunification throughout the year, in addition to the week-long camp.


ACLU Zeroing In On Michigan’s New Discriminatory Adoption Law

The Advocate - 06/15/2015

Job one right now for the American Civil Liberties Union in Michigan is to find a legal challenge to the newly-signed law that allows faith-based adoption agencies in Michigan to turn away same-sex or unmarried couples based on their religious beliefs.

Adoptees push state Legislature to pass ‘long overdue’ law granting them birth certificate access

Daily News - 06/15/2015

Adoptees believe they finally have enough votes in the state Legislature to pass a law granting them access to their birth certificates — but it still may not be enough.
With just days before the Legislature ends its session, supporters of the so-called Bill of Adoptee Rights said the measure has more than enough support to pass but they are struggling to convince leaders in the Assembly and Senate to allow a vote.